Friday, May 19, 2006

Low and West








These pictures complete the collection of "Rake's Progress" by David Low and Rebecca West. Note Alfred Hitchcock in the film set (And Charles Laughton) Mosley can be seen in the church congregation and Low's boss, Lord Beaverbrook is in several pictures. Looking with attention at these illustrations I am marvelled by their elegant grace and the fabulous body language of the characters.They remind me of the world of Jean Renoir's "La Règle du Jeu", which was produced six years after the publication of this book.

20 Comments:

Blogger A. Riabovitchev said...

I love these illustrations very much!:O)Full of life and very funny!:O)

12:02 pm  
Blogger limbolo said...

Simply...The best.
The young Hitchcock is great.

2:13 pm  
Anonymous Amid said...

THANK YOU for sharing, Oscar! These are amazing!!! I'd never seen anything besides Low's comics. Do you know if he did more color illustration like this?

2:59 pm  
Blogger Matthew Cruickshank said...

This book is sensational. You better hide it very well next Sunday!!

3:25 pm  
Blogger Nick Sung said...

These are unbelievably good! These last few posts are really really exciting!--I think these are just gorgeous compositions.

3:27 pm  
Blogger Nick Sung said...

And the characters are so damn fun too!
Terrific drawing and very fun.
Thanks Oscar!

3:29 pm  
Blogger Oscar Grillo said...

Nick I wish I WAS THE ARTIST!!!!

Matt: No much luck for you next Sunday because those scans are taken from a copy owned by a friend...Luckily I found a first edition in Australia and I bought it yesterday, but I haven't got it yet.

Amid: I don' know many works by Low in colour. I have three originals by him in black and white, one is a pencil sketch drawn at a Democratic Party convention in the US in the fifties.
There are some Low originals available at reasonable prices..Look for Chris Beetle's Galleries in London. They have some terrific illustration artwork for sale. Their catalogues are wonderful.
http://www.chrisbeetles.com/index.htm

3:52 pm  
Blogger limbolo said...

I'm at it again:
The repulsive Mosely is standing with his hands in his pockets at the wedding. (Mosely was still a fashionable figure at this time - this is a very flattering cariacature of one of the true shits of this era.)
I'm willing to guess at Beaverbrook in the boxing scene but I don't see him elsewhere.
THe huge, fat man looks like Francis L Sullivan but that may only be because Sullivan played such a character (brilliantly) in NIGHT AND THE CITY.

Is there a hidden satire here on Edward, Prince of Wales?

Isn't there anyone else out there to join in the guessing game?

6:25 pm  
Blogger Oscar Grillo said...

No one out there, Limbó, is al old as you and me.

6:43 pm  
Blogger Patricia said...

Aha! I spotted Charles Laughton in the bottom one! He is costumed as Henry VIII!

7:53 pm  
Anonymous Gustavo said...

En la imágen de abajo, el gordo que está en el centro es Pichuco Troilo ( sí, ya sé, me van a decir que estoy loco pero es que Low era tan capo que lo dibujó idéntico a Pichuco sin ni siquiera saber de su existencia. Eso solamente lo hacen los genios, che...)

1:32 am  
Blogger Oscar Grillo said...

Si, Gustavo. Ese ES Pichuco y esta es una instantanea sacada durante el rodaje de "Los Tres Berretines", donde el pibe Troilo tocaba en la eponima orquesta de Fucile-Marafiotti.

3:15 am  
Anonymous Gustavo said...

¡¡Qué grande!!!...entonces el de traje negro será Luis Sandrini?

11:14 pm  
Anonymous Gustavo said...

Aunque se parece mas bien a Red Skelton...

2:57 pm  
Blogger dan_illustration said...

In his autobiography, David Low explained how his cartoons usually took three days to draw.

I worked an eight-hour day - sometimes ten-hour - day and with evenings spent moving around seeing people, it was a busy life. Making a cartoon occupied usually about three full days, two spent in labour and one in removing the appearance of labour. Sometimes I wondered whether I was not taking too much trouble. But when I learned that the methods of Brueghel, Callot, Daumier, Gillray and the other Old Masters of Caricature had been similarly thorough, that Tenniel took two or three days to make a Punch cartoon.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jlow.htm

11:15 pm  
Blogger dan_illustration said...

Oscar - do you know the work of Fritz Eichenberg? I love his work myself. Low's political penetration and Kollwitz's humane empathy. -Dan

11:21 pm  
Blogger Poptique said...

I think that's musical comedy star Jack Hulbert with the huge chin in the bottom picture.

They're fantastic - do you have any work by J. Millar Watt would did a strip called Pop in the 30s thru to the 50s which was similarly elegant?

11:47 am  
Blogger Oscar Grillo said...

You are absolutely right in both accounts, Poptique.

2:09 pm  
Blogger Poptique said...

Hurrah! I like being right.

9:22 pm  
Anonymous Mark Fuller said...

In the film set painting, I think the man with the megaphone is Anthony 'Puffin' Asquith (Son of Herbert)...Hitch's main rival in British studios at the time...

7:35 pm  

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